Does an LLC protect the business name?

When you incorporate, form an LLC, or file a DBA (Doing Business As), this process registers your business name with that state’s secretary of state. … It prevents anyone else from using the name within the state, but it doesn’t offer any kind of protection in the other 49 states.

Why do people put LLC in their business name?

Having an LLC in your name tells potential customers and clients that you’ve taken that extra step of registering an LLC. This can help to make your business look more reputable or legitimate, which can be an important consideration especially when your business is just starting out.

Should I get an LLC or trademark first?

In many cases, a business will want to start the trademark application as soon as their LLC or corporation paperwork is filed. By filing for a trademark prior to launch, you can be sure that your name is protected once you begin commercial sales. However, there may be an even stronger reason to apply early.

Do I need to protect my business name?

While you’re not required to trademark your name and logo, doing so gives you added protection if someone uses a name or logo that’s the same or confusingly similar. Start by searching the Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) database to see if anyone has already trademarked a similar business name and/or logo.

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Does your LLC name matter?

Yes, it does matter what you name your LLC. As a business owner, you need to consider the marketing aspects of your business name. You also should be careful to choose a business name which is not used by others, especially in your home state.

So, do you need to incorporate “LLC” in your logo? In short, the answer is no. In fact, none of your branding/marketing needs to include “LLC,” “Inc.” or “Ltd.” If it is included, this may look amateur. … Logos are an extension of a company’s trade name, so marketing departments don’t need to include legal designation.

What is a good LLC name?

Choose a name that’s appealing, memorable, easy to use, easy to pronounce, and easy to spell. Keeping your name short is also recommended.

Can an LLC own a trademark?

There are many different types of legal entities that can own a trademark. The most common that we see, and also the simplest, are LLCs and corporations. Usually, a LLC or corporation develops a mark to identify itself as a source of goods or services.

A trademark can protect your name and logo in case someone else wants to use them for their own purposes. Also, you cannot really copyright a name, since copyright protects artistic works. This is exactly why you need to have a trademark that protects your company’s intellectual property, such as your logo.

What’s better sole proprietorship or LLC?

The main difference between a sole proprietorship and an LLC is that an LLC will protect your personal assets if your business is sued or suffers a loss. Most serious business owners choose to form an LLC vs. a sole proprietorship because an LLC legally separates the owner’s personal assets from the business.

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Can someone steal my business name?

If someone uses your name, simply showing proof that you’ve trademarked the name could be enough to convince a business to choose something else. Most importantly, if you must go to court, you’ll have legal proof that you registered the name. However, you don’t have to trademark your business name to protect it.

Can you start a business without a trademark?

Registering your business name for a trademark isn’t required in order for you to have trademark rights. However, a registered trademark can provide greater protection for your brand while helping you build your brand and drive business growth.

How much does it cost to trademark your business?

Filing a trademark for your business name with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will cost between $225 and $600, plus legal fees. You can register with most states for $50-$150 if you don’t want protection outside your state.

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